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Advanced Science and Data

RMS earthquake modeling integrates learnings from recent and historical events, the latest earthquake science, location-specific geologic conditions, and engineering research on building performance from around the world to deliver valuable earthquake risk insights.

Grow Premiums

Select better risks with high-resolution probabilistic liquefaction modeling that allows for a better understanding of the location and severity of liquefaction risk.

Meet Capital Requirements

Extensive stochastic event sets to capture the full range of potential earthquakes to produce a comprehensive representation of events at key return periods including tail risk events.

Improve Exposure Management

Evaluate potential hot spots and drivers of risk in earthquake portfolios for effective risk differentiation strategies.

Model Features

RMS earthquake models provide you with the information you need to understand, evaluate, and manage earthquake risk in regions around the world.

Region-Specific Insights

Gain deep understanding of regional differences, including tectonic settings, built environments, and market conditions.

Comprehensive Solution

Assess the spectrum of potential earthquake losses with models that leverage computational power and data-driven approaches to reduce uncertainty.

Secondary Perils

See the potential loss impacts of secondary perils such as liquefaction, landslide, fire following earthquake, and tsunami in our complete view of earthquake risk.

Local Knowledge

Benefit from country-specific expertise with models built in close collaboration with on-the-ground scientific agencies, local engineers, and research bodies.

Regional and Country Earthquake Models

Regional Models

Click a region on the interactive map to see coverage.
See Global Model coverage
Global Map
North America Earthquake Models
Europe Earthquake Models
  • Andorra

  • Austria

  • Azores

  • Belgium

  • Bulgaria

  • Canary Islands

  • France (including Monaco)

  • Germany

  • Greece

  • Hungary

  • Ireland

  • Italy (including San Marino and Vatican City)

  • Liechtenstein

  • Luxembourg

  • Madeira Islands

  • Netherlands

  • Portugal (including Madeira Islands)

  • Romania

  • Slovenia

  • Spain

  • Switzerland

  • Turkey

  • United Kingdom

Asia-Pacific Earthquake Models
  • Australia

  • China

  • Guam

  • Hong Kong

  • India

  • Indonesia

  • Israel

  • Japan

  • Macau

  • Malaysia

  • New Zealand

  • Philippines

  • Singapore

  • South Korea

  • Taiwan

  • Thailand

  • Vietnam

Latin America Earthquake Models
  • Caribbean
  • Anguilla

  • Antigua & Barbuda

  • Barbados

  • British Virgin Islands

  • Cayman Islands

  • Dominica

  • Dominican Republic

  • Grenada

  • Guadeloupe

  • Haiti

  • Jamaica

  • Martinique

  • Montserrat

  • Puerto Rico

  • Saba

  • Sint. Maartin

  • St. Barthelemy

  • St. Eustatius

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • St. Lucia

  • St. Martin

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Trinidad & Tobago

  • Turks & Caicos

  • U.S. Virgin Islands

  • Central America
  • Belize

  • Costa Rica

  • El Salvador

  • Guatemala

  • Honduras

  • Nicaragua

  • Panama

  • South America
  • Argentina

  • Bolivia

  • Brazil

  • Chile

  • Colombia

  • Ecuador

  • Peru

  • Venezuela

North America
Latin America
Europe
Asia-Pacific
North America Earthquake Models
Europe Earthquake Models
  • Andorra

  • Austria

  • Azores

  • Belgium

  • Bulgaria

  • Canary Islands

  • France (including Monaco)

  • Germany

  • Greece

  • Hungary

  • Ireland

  • Italy (including San Marino and Vatican City)

  • Liechtenstein

  • Luxembourg

  • Madeira Islands

  • Netherlands

  • Portugal (including Madeira Islands)

  • Romania

  • Slovenia

  • Spain

  • Switzerland

  • Turkey

  • United Kingdom

Asia-Pacific Earthquake Models
  • Australia

  • China

  • Guam

  • Hong Kong

  • India

  • Indonesia

  • Israel

  • Japan

  • Macau

  • Malaysia

  • New Zealand

  • Philippines

  • Singapore

  • South Korea

  • Taiwan

  • Thailand

  • Vietnam

Latin America Earthquake Models
  • Caribbean
  • Anguilla

  • Antigua & Barbuda

  • Barbados

  • British Virgin Islands

  • Cayman Islands

  • Dominica

  • Dominican Republic

  • Grenada

  • Guadeloupe

  • Haiti

  • Jamaica

  • Martinique

  • Montserrat

  • Puerto Rico

  • Saba

  • Sint. Maartin

  • St. Barthelemy

  • St. Eustatius

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • St. Lucia

  • St. Martin

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Trinidad & Tobago

  • Turks & Caicos

  • U.S. Virgin Islands

  • Central America
  • Belize

  • Costa Rica

  • El Salvador

  • Guatemala

  • Honduras

  • Nicaragua

  • Panama

  • South America
  • Argentina

  • Bolivia

  • Brazil

  • Chile

  • Colombia

  • Ecuador

  • Peru

  • Venezuela

Spotlight

Related Products

The RMS earthquake model and related data are included in several RMS products – each tailored to serve different use cases.

SiteIQ
SiteIQ

Assess a location’s risk to multiple perils, loss potential, and key third-party insights in seconds with this application.

risk modeler
Risk Modeler 2.0

Leverage structure-based modeling and analytical tools, including intelligent model processing and big data query capabilities.

location-intelligence
Location Intelligence API

Gain better underwriting perspective with instant access to the world’s best catastrophe insights.

What Makes RMS Earthquake Models Different?

Scientific Insight

Working with leading scientific agencies and partners, each RMS earthquake model incorporates the latest findings in earthquake research from institutions such as the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) and national bodies around the world.

Sub-perils

Accounting for the impact of sub-perils including tsunami and fire-following earthquake, where applicable, RMS models integrate sub-perils to allow their impact to be separately assessed. Liquefaction and landslide, complex secondary geohazards, are modelled to capture the potential for generating both widespread and highly localized losses.

Focus on Ground Motion

New innovations include advanced ground motion modeling that predicts the extent to which shaking attenuates from source to site and high-resolution ground motion amplification models that reflect the latest science; through to custom-built sedimentary basin models for areas with the greatest potential for large amplifications.

Latest Events

RMS earthquake models incorporate learnings from the latest earthquake events, such as the 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake, 2010-11 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence of events and 2016 Kaikoura in New Zealand, 2011 Tohoku in Japan and larger, significant U.S. events from the last thirty years such as 1994 Northridge and 1989 Loma Prieta.

Resources

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Sydney Harbor
Blog
Australia: Comparing Earthquake Rates for New South Wales

The Mw5.9 earthquake that hit close to Melbourne, Australia, on September 22 is the largest onshore earthquake in the state of Victoria in recorded history. It reminds us that if RMS® only used the earthquake catalog to model seismic hazard in Australia, the frequency of these larger events would probably not be very accurate and likely be too low. So, how do we account for these larger-magnitude earthquakes in the RMS® Australia Earthquake Model? Australia…

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Fukushima, Japan - April 30, 2011
Blog
A Look Back at the 2011 Great East Japan (Tohoku) Earthquake

Major earthquake disasters are fortunately rare, but when they happen, it is an opportunity to learn and continue to push the boundaries of earthquake science and engineering. Ten years ago, on March 11, 2011, at 2:46 p.m. local time, an M9.0 earthquake occurred offshore of the east coast of the Tohoku region on the island of Honshu, Japan. It was the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in the country. The epicenter was 80 miles (130 kilometers) east of…

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Damage to buildings in Christchurch after the 2011earthquake
Blog
Understanding the Aftershock Cloud: 10 Years on Since the Christchurch Earthquakes

Since the year 2000, only one city located in an advanced market economy has been severely impacted by an earthquake. This was the Mw6.2 event that occurred on February 22, 2011, in Christchurch, the capital of South Island, New Zealand, with an epicenter at Port Hills on the southern edge of the city. This event was part of the 2010–11 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence, which started with the Mw7.1 Darfield Earthquake on September 4, 2010. The Christchurch…

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New Zealand Earthquake
Blog
New Zealand Earthquake: How the Last Decade Has Changed Everything

Go back to this time 10 years ago and earthquake risk in New Zealand was a relatively low priority for the global (re)insurance industry; a decade later, and this perspective has certainly changed. Insured losses of around NZ$40 billion (US$24.1 billion) came from the 2010-2011 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence (CES) and the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake; the former is the world’s second largest earthquake insured loss. These events had a considerable impact across…

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Australia Map
Blog
Newcastle: Thirtieth Anniversary of Australia’s Largest Earthquake Loss. But What If…?

Over the past 15 years, we have witnessed some of the world’s largest possible recorded earthquakes that have had catastrophic impacts around the globe. But, looking back 30 years to 1989, we saw two smaller, but still significant earthquakes. The first was the M6.9 Loma Prieta event that hit the San Francisco Bay Area in October, an earthquake that is familiar to many due to its proximity to the city, and its level of destruction. However,…

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power-of-a-crisis
News
The Power of a Crisis

As Christchurch City Council continues to build back better, will its resilience investment pay dividends when it comes to citywide insurance cover?

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