Tag Archives: Trading Risk;

A Toe in the Water: Trading Risk Panel Discusses U.S. Flood Risk Opportunities

With positive changes under way to improve both public and private carrier participation across the U.S. flood market, many are looking to seize the opportunity that the U.S. flood market presents. Insurers, reinsurers, and the capital markets are exploring this opportunity which, in turn, has created a thirst for knowledge. I had the opportunity to see this first-hand when I was invited by Trading Risk magazine to take part in a panel discussion at the Trading Risk ILS: Reloaded and Resurgent event in New York last month. Sofia Geraghty from Trading Risk served as our moderator, and Joanna Syroka, Director of New Markets at Fermat Capital Management, and Ian Hanson, Vice President of Willis Re, were also on the panel.

One point that the audience wanted to understand was the level of demand to take on flood risk from an investor’s viewpoint, and also whether U.S. flood risk can be a portfolio diversifier. From the insurance-linked securities (ILS) side, Joanna confirmed the demand is there, but as with any peril, the ILS market needs to be able to clearly understand and define the risk to get comfortable enough to invest.

Continue reading

New Opportunities for Investors Willing to Embrace the “Resilience Gap”

This is a reprint of a “Trading Room” interview from Trading Risk magazine, please click here to visit the magazine website.

 

Opportunities abound for investors willing to embrace the resilience gap, according to RMS global managing director Daniel Stander

How does the Protection Gap offer opportunities for investors?

I’m afraid you’ve pushed one of my buttons with your very first question! I’ve been trying (unsuccessfully it seems) to move the debate away from the “protection gap”. I much prefer to talk about the “resilience gap”. This isn’t me being a pedant. The language we use here is important. Framing the problem in terms of “protection” grounds the debate in risk-transfer solutions.

But we all know that risk capital alone cannot address the fact that communities all over the world are frequently brought to their knees by the impacts of extreme events. Risk financing is no silver bullet. Those at risk — from the individual homeowner to the elected official governing a sovereign state — need much more than just contingent capital to materially increase their resilience to acute shocks. They need to develop a deeper understanding of the risks they face — and how it compares to their desired ability to withstand extremes.

More than that, they need to understand what interventions offer an acceptable ROI — from enforcing building codes to preserving nature-based defenses. And then of course they need to be prepared to respond effectively when the ground shakes or the wind blows, lest the economic impacts escalate. Opportunities abound for investors – but they will only be seized by those who can embrace the totality of the “resilience gap” and position their risk capital in the totality of the need.

Continue reading