Author Archives: Tom Sabbatelli

About Tom Sabbatelli

Senior Product Manager, Model Product Management
Tom is a Senior Product Manager in the Model Product Management team, focusing on the North Atlantic Hurricane Model suite of products. He joined RMS in 2009 and spent several years in the Client Support Services organization, primarily providing specialist peril model support. Tom joined RMS upon completion of his B.S. and M.S. degrees in meteorology from The Pennsylvania State University, where he studied the statistical influence of climate state variables on tropical cyclone frequency. He is a member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS).

Is this the year that breaks the streak?

Sports fans around the world have witnessed impressive winning streaks throughout history. After capturing two consecutive UEFA European Championships (2008, 2012) and a World Cup championship (2010), the Spanish National Football Team entered the 2014 World Cup in Brazil as the top-ranked squad in international competition. The dominant Spaniards were among the international sportsbooks’ favorites to bring home the trophy once again.

Instead, surprising defeats at the hands of the Netherlands and Chile eliminated Spain at the group stage. Spain’s streak of dominance came to a sudden end, marking the earliest World Cup exit for a defending champion since 1950.

From a meteorological perspective, the United States is currently riding its own streak: ten Atlantic hurricane seasons without a major hurricane (category 3 or above) making landfall, the longest such stretch in recorded history. With another hurricane season upon us, many will be keeping a keen eye on the Atlantic this summer to see if this impressive streak will continue.

Global forecasting groups, such as Colorado State University and Tropical Storm Risk, have issued their tropical storm and hurricane activity forecasts for the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season. Christopher Allen of the RMS Event Response team has authored an excellent summary of their forecasts in the RMS 2016 North Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook published this week on

You can also listen to my summary of the season’s forecasts during my talk to AM Best TV’s John Weber. In summary, most forecasts are predicting anywhere between near-average to above-average activity in the Atlantic basin, reflecting conflicting signals in the key indicators that influence hurricane formation.

Will we have increased hurricane activity?

One factor that may support increased hurricane activity this season is the anticipated state of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, or ENSO. As reported on this blog several months ago, many ENSO forecasts project a transition out of last year’s historic El Niño phase into a La Niña phase, which is historically more favorable for hurricane development. Wind shear, detrimental to tropical cyclone formation, typically is reduced in the Atlantic basin during La Niña phases of ENSO.

Mid-May 2016 observations and model forecasts of ENSO, based on the NINO3.4 index, through March 2017. Positive values correspond with El Niño, while negative values correspond with La Niña. Source: International Research Institute for Climate and Society

Conversely, some forecasts predict a cooling of Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), which would oppose any support provided by a forecasted La Niña and reduce the potential for an active hurricane season. This cooling has been driven by a lengthened positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), which causes stronger than normal trade winds in the tropical North Atlantic and upwelling of deeper cold ocean water near the surface.

February-April 2016 sea level pressure anomalies in the North Atlantic Ocean (hPa, anomalies with respect to 1981-2010 climatology). Anomalously high pressure evident in the Azores and the mid-latitude North Atlantic signals a positive phase of the NAO. Source: National Centers for Environmental Prediction Monthly Reanalysis (Kalnay, E. and Coauthors, 1996: The NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 40-year Project. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 77, 437-471).

The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation may also be transitioning into a prolonged phase detrimental to tropical cyclone development, a theory often mentioned on this blog, although one that is still debated in the scientific community.

If considered in isolation, La Niña conditions and cooling Atlantic SSTs exert conflicting influences on Atlantic tropical cyclone development. However, forecasts contain key caveats that will ultimately determine this season’s activity:

  • Although a transition into a La Niña phase is widely anticipated, a late arrival would limit its ability to support development in the basin.
  • Further, forecasts of Atlantic sea surface temperature during August and September, the peak of hurricane season, remain conflicted.

Does the season’s early storm activity signify more activity?

Forecasts predicting above-average basin activity are understandable, given the early activity observed prior to the season’s official start. Tropical Storms Bonnie and Colin both formed before the second week in June, bringing heavy rainfall to South Carolina and the Gulf coast of Florida, respectively. Bonnie and Colin followed Hurricane Alex, the first January hurricane since 1938.

Bonnie’s formation marked the first time since 2012 that two named storms developed before June 1, the official start of hurricane season. The 2012 season ended with 19 total named storms, the third-most on record, including Superstorm Sandy, which caused more than $18 billion in insured losses.

Would the industry be prepared for the next major hurricane landfall? According to Fitch, the answer is yes: insurers and reinsurers in 18 coastal U.S. states would be equipped to handle one major event this season, although this resiliency has not been recently tested. More worrying, though, are the prospects of a large tail event or even multiple landfalling events, which may be supported by the right combination of oceanic and atmospheric influences.

With the hurricane season now officially underway, we will watch, wait and see how the season’s activity unfolds over the next few months. What is certain, though, is that streaks are made to be broken. It’s just a matter of when.

Are We Any Closer to Determining What’s Going on in the Atlantic?

It’s not often that you see an Atlantic hurricane making headlines in January. Subtropical Storm Alex was named by the National Hurricane Center on January 13, 2016 and strengthened into a hurricane one day later. Although Alex ultimately exhibited a short lifespan and caused minimal damage, the storm has the scientific and risk management communities talking about what it might mean for the 2016 hurricane season and the near-term state of the basin.

In October, we discussed the below-average rate of landfalling hurricanes in recent Atlantic seasons, the influence of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) on basin activity phase shifts, and how shifts are reflected within the RMS Medium Term Rates (MTR) methodology.

In response to recent quiet seasons, scientists hypothesized about a possible shift in Atlantic hurricane frequency, one that would end the observed active Atlantic hurricane regime that began around the mid-1990s. Central to these discussions was commentary published in the October 2015 edition of Nature Geosciences, suggesting that AMO is entering a negative phase detrimental to Atlantic cyclogenesis.

However, recent peer-reviewed research highlights how sensitive the historical record is to the precise definitions used for hurricane activity. An article soon to be published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society argues that the definition of the recent “hurricane drought,” based on the number of U.S. major landfalling hurricanes, may be arbitrary. This research finds that small adjustments to intensity thresholds used to define the drought, as measured by maximum winds or minimum central pressure, would shorten the drought or eliminate it completely.

In its most recent annual review of the Atlantic basin, RMS recognized that the anticipated atmospheric conditions for the upcoming season present a unique challenge. The latest forecasts suggest that the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), another key indicator of hurricane frequency, may oppose the influence of a negative AMO.

ENSO represents fluctuating ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific that influence global weather patterns. El Niño, or a warm phase of ENSO, is associated with increased Atlantic wind shear that historically inhibits tropical cyclone development in the basin. La Niña, or a cool phase of ENSO, is associated with decreased Atlantic wind shear that historically supports tropical cyclone development.

Illustrations of the three main phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Source: Reef Resilience

ENSO has played an important role in influencing tropical cyclone activity in recent Atlantic hurricane seasons, particularly in 2015. Last season, the basin experienced one of the strongest El Niño phases on record, which contributed to below-average activity and well-below normal Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE), an index quantifying total seasonal duration and intensity. .

Looking ahead, the latest ENSO forecasts predict a shift out of the current El Niño phase over the next few months towards a more neutral or even a La Niña phase. The extent to which these conditions impact hurricane activity for 2016 is still to be determined; however, these conditions historically support above average activity.

Mid-February 2016 observations and model forecasts of ENSO, based on the NINO3.4 index, through December 2016. Positive values correspond with El Niño, while negative values correspond with La Niña. Sharp shifts from El Niño to La Niña are not unprecedented: La Niña conditions quickly followed the very strong El Niño of 1997-98. Source: International Research Institute for Climate and Society

The concurrence of potential changes in both the AMO and ENSO represent a unique period for 2016:

  • A negative AMO phase may act to suppress Atlantic hurricane activity in 2016.
  • A neutral or La Niña ENSO phase may act to enhance Atlantic hurricane activity in 2016.

These signals also have a range of potential implications on the RMS MTR forecast. Thus, RMS will spend the upcoming months closely engaging both the scientific community and market regarding this unique state of the basin and its potential forward-looking implications on hurricane activity. Modelers will evaluate the influence and sensitivities of new data, new methods, and new science on the MTR forecast. During this time, RMS will communicate results and insights to the broader market across a variety of mediums, including at Exceedance in May.

This post was co-authored by Jeff Waters and Tom Sabbatelli. 

Jeff Waters

Meteorologist and Manager, Model Product Strategy, RMS
Jeff Waters is a meteorologist who specializes in tropical meteorology, climatology, and general atmospheric science. At RMS, Jeff is responsible for guiding the insurance market’s understanding and usage of RMS models including the North American hurricane, severe convective storm, earthquake, winter storm, and terrorism models. In his role he assists the development of RMS model release communications and strategies, and regularly interacts with rating agencies and regulators around RMS model releases, updates, and general model best practices. Jeff is a member of the American Meteorological Society, the International Society of Catastrophe Managers, and the U.S. Reinsurance Under 40s Group, and has co-authored articles for the Journal of Climate. Jeff holds a BS in geography and meteorology from Ohio University and an MS in meteorology from Penn State University. His academic achievements have been recognized by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American Meteorological Society.