Tag Archives: RMS Japan Typhoon Model

Typhoon Hagibis: Japan’s Wettest Typhoon on Record

Japan continues to assess the extent of the damage caused by Typhoon Hagibis, which made landfall near the Izu Peninsula in Shizuoka Prefecture on Saturday, October 12. Current reports state that at least 66 people have been killed, dozens of people are missing, and hundreds are injured. At this time, the worst impacted prefectures include Nagano, Saitama, Shizuoka, and Fukushima.

However, the full extent of the damage is not expected to be known for several days as rescue operations and official damage assessments continue – rescuers cannot reach some areas due to high water levels. The Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, stated that there is no plan to slow rescue operations, with around 13,000 police, 66,000 firefighters and 31,000 Self-Defense Forces personnel involved. The numbers of structures and properties affected is predicted to rise. 

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Super Typhoon Hagibis: Will It Weaken by the Weekend?

As of Thursday afternoon (October 10), Super Typhoon Hagibis remains a powerful Category 4 equivalent hurricane with maximum sustained wind speeds of 150 miles per hour (240 kilometers per hour). The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) has described the storm as “violent” – its highest tropical cyclone classification.

Hagibis hit the headlines in recent days after it underwent one of the most rapid intensifications ever observed: its maximum sustained wind speeds intensified from 60 to 160 miles per hour in just 24 hours on October 6-7. According to media reports, only Hurricane Wilma in 2005 and Patricia in 2015, are known to have strengthened more quickly. Its peak wind speed of 160 miles per hour (258 kilometers an hour) is equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

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Typhoon Faxai: Walking in Its Tracks

Typhoon Faxai was the strongest landfalling typhoon to impact the Greater Tokyo area since Typhoon Ma-on in 2004. Making two landfalls as it traveled across the Tokyo Bay, Faxai made a brief landfall over the Miura Peninsula, Kanagawa prefecture in the Kanto region of Japan, just 35 miles (57 kilometers) south-southwest of Tokyo early morning local time on Monday, September 9.

It then tracked northeast to make a second landfall over the city of Chiba (pop. ~979,000), Chiba prefecture, 20 miles (32 kilometers) east of Tokyo. Maximum sustained wind speeds at its landfalls were equivalent to a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Just four days after, RMS reconnaissance was in Chiba prefecture, surveying the damage.

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Typhoon Faxai: Strongest Typhoon to Impact Greater Tokyo in Fifteen Years

Power outages in Chiba Prefecture looked set to continue into the coming weeks as the region continues to recover from Typhoon Faxai. It was one of the strongest landfalling typhoons on record in the seven prefectures of the Kanto region surrounding Tokyo and the strongest to impact the Greater Tokyo area since Typhoon Ma-on in 2004.

Two Landfalls as Faxai Travels Across Tokyo Bay

Typhoon Faxai made a brief landfall over the Miura Peninsula, Kanagawa Prefecture in the Kanto region of Japan, just 35 miles (57 kilometers) south-southwest of Tokyo early morning local time on Monday, September 9. The center of the typhoon then tracked northeast across Tokyo Bay and made a second landfall over the city of Chiba (pop. ~979,000), Chiba Prefecture, Japan, 20 miles (32 kilometers) east of Tokyo.

According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, Faxai had maximum sustained wind speeds of 102 to 106 miles per hour (165 to 170 kilometers per hour) at its landfalls, equivalent to a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

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Asia’s Costliest Cyclones: The Curse of September

The northwest Pacific is the most active tropical cyclone basin in the world, having produced some of the most intense and costly cyclone events on record. The 2015 typhoon season has been particularly active due to this year’s strong El Niño conditions.

The unpredictable nature of the El Niño phenomenon, which affects the genesis and pathway of tropical cyclones, and the complexity of tropical cyclone systems underscore the need to fully understand typhoon risk—particularly in Japan where exposure concentrations are high. Catastrophe models, such as the forthcoming RMS® Japan Typhoon Model, using a basin-wide event set to model the three key correlated perils—wind, inland and coastal flood—are more effective in enabling firms to price and manage the ever-evolving exposures that are at risk from this multifaceted peril.

The Significance of September

Peak typhoon season in the northwest Pacific basin is between July and October, but it’s September that typically sees the highest number of strong category 3-5 typhoons making landfall: eight of the top ten greatest insured losses from northwest Pacific tropical cyclones since 1980 all occurred in September.

In September, during El Niño years, Guam is significantly more susceptible to a higher proportion of landfalls, and Japan and Taiwan experience a slight increase due to the genesis and pathway of tropical cyclones. While wind is the primary driver of tropical cyclone loss in Japan, inland and coastal flooding also contribute substantially to the loss.

In September 1999, Typhoon Bart caused $3.5 billion in insured losses due to strong winds, heavy rainfall, and one of the highest storm surges on record at the time. The height of the storm surge reached 3.5 meters in Yatushiro Bay, western Japan, and destroyed coastal defences, inundating vast areas of land.

Five years later in September 2004, Typhoon Songda caused insured losses of $4.7 billion. Much of the loss was caused by rain-related events and flooding of more than 10,000 homes across South Korea and Japan in the Chugoku region, western Honshu.

Table 1 Top 10 Costliest Tropical Storms in Asia (1980-2014):

Date Event Affected Area Maximum Strength (SSHWS) Insured Loss ($mn)
Sept, 1991 Mireille Japan Cat 4 6,000
Sept, 2004 Songda Japan, South Korea Cat 4 4,700
Sept, 1999 Bart Japan, South Korea Cat 5 3,500
Sept, 1998 Vicki Japan, Philippines Cat 2 1,600
Oct, 2004 Tokage Japan Cat 4 1,300
Sept 2011 Roke Japan Cat 4 1,200
Aug – Sept, 2004 Chaba Japan, Russia Cat 5 1,200
Sept, 2006 Shanshan Japan, South Korea Cat 4 1,200
Sept, 2000 Saomai Japan, South Korea, Guam, Russia Cat 5 1,100
Sept, 1993 Yancy Japan Cat 4 980

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September 2015 – A Costly Landfall for Japan?

This September we have already seen Tropical Storm Etau, which brought heavy rains to Aichi Prefecture on Honshu Island causing immense flooding to more than 16,000 buildings, and triggered dozens of landslides and mudslides.

The increased tropical cyclone activity in the northwest Pacific this year has been attributed to an El Niño event that is forecast to strengthen further. Two factors linked to El Niño events suggest that this September could still see a costly landfall in Japan:

  • El Nino conditions drive the formation of tropical cyclones further eastward, increasing the travel times and distances of typhoons over water, giving rise to more intense events.
  • More northward recurving of storms produces tropical cyclones that track towards Japan, increasing the number of typhoons that could make landfall.

Combined, the above conditions increase the number of strong typhoons that make landfall in Japan.

Damaging Typhoons Don’t Just Occur In September

Damaging typhoons don’t just occur in September or El Niño years – they can happen under any conditions.

Of the ten costliest events, only Typhoon Mireille in 1999 and Typhoons Songda, Chaba, and Tokage, all of which made landfall in 2004, occurred during El Niño years

Look out for more information on this topic in the RMS paper “Effects of the El Niño Southern Oscillation on Typhoon Landfalls in the Northwest Pacific”, due to be published in October.