Tag Archives: marine cargo

Hurricane Harvey: Impact on Marine Cargo

Chris Folkman, director – Product Management, RMS

Rajkiran Vojjala, vice president – Modeling, RMS

As Hurricane Harvey barreled eastward from Houston, Port of Houston officials spoke of restarting operations by Labor Day (Monday, September 4) after its channels are checked for shoaling and obstructions. The eighth busiest container port in the U.S. reported no major damage to its terminals, warehouses or storage facilities, and traffic was diverted to other regional ports and processing facilities away from the storm’s path. Maritime officials, it seems, have learned lessons from Superstorm Sandy, where cargo was hastily unstacked in anticipation of high winds before a devastating storm surge caused extensive damage to cargo, chassis, and port warehouses.

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No More Guessing Games for Marine Insurers

Huge ports mean huge amounts of cargo. Huge amounts of cargo mean huge accumulations of risk.

As a guiding principle about where marine insurers are exposed to the highest potential losses, it seems reasonable enough. But in fact, as RMS research has proven this week, this proposition may be a bit misleading. Surprisingly, a port’s size and its catastrophe loss potential are not strongly correlated.

Take the Port of Plaquemines, LA which is just south-east of New Orleans. It is neither well known nor big in comparison with others around the world. Yet it has the third highest risk in the world of insurance loss due to catastrophe: our analysis revealed its 500-year marine cargo loss from hurricane would be $1.5 billion.

Plaquemines is not an isolated case. There were other smaller ports in our ranking: Pascagoula, MS in the United States ranks 6 on our list with a potential $1 billion marine cargo loss due to storm surge and hurricane; Bremerhaven in Germany (ranked 4th at $1 billion) and Le Havre in France (ranked 10th at $0.7 billion).

Asia-Pacific ports featured less frequently, but worryingly one Asia port topped the list: Nagoya, Japan was number 1 ($2.3 billion potential losses) with Guangzhou, China a close second ($2 billion). Our analysis modeled risk posed by earthquake, wind, and storm surge perils in a 500-year return period across 150 ports – the top ten results are further down this blog.

Ports At Risk For Highest Lost
(500 year estimated catastrophe loss for earthquake, wind, and storm surge perils)

Estimated Marine Cargo Loss in Billions USD
1 Nagoya, Japan 2.3
2 Guangzhou, China 2.0
3 Plaquemines, LA, U.S. 1.5
4 Bremerhaven, Germany 1.0
5 New Orleans, LA, U.S. 1.0
6 Pascagoula, MS, U.S. 1.0
7 Beaumont, TX, U.S. 0.9
8 Baton Rouge, LA, U.S. 0.8
9 Houston, TX, U.S. 0.8
10 Le Havre, France 0.7

* Losses rounded to one decimal place.

Our analysis demonstrates what we at RMS have long suspected: outdated marine risk modeling tools and incomplete data obscure many high-risk locations, big and small. These ports are risky because of the natural perils they face and the cargos which transit through them, as well as the precise way those cargos are stored. But many in the marine sector don’t have these comprehensive insights. Instead they have to make do with a guessing game in determining catastrophe risk and port accumulations. And with the advanced analytics available in 2016 this is no longer good enough.

Big Port or Small – Risk Can Now Be Determined

Back to that seemingly simple proposition about the relationship between port size and insurance risk which I began this blog with. As the table above demonstrates, smaller ports can also present a huge risk.

But the bigger ships and bigger ports brought about by containerization have led, overall, to a bigger risk exposure for marine insurers. Not least because larger vessels have rendered many river ports inaccessible forcing shippers to rely on seaside ports, which are more vulnerable to hurricanes, typhoons, and storm surge.

The value of global catastrophe-exposed cargo is already huge and is likely to keep growing. But the right tools, which use the most precise data, can reveal where the risk of insurance loss is greatest. Leveraging these tools, (re)insurers can avoid dangerous cargo accumulations and underwrite with greater confidence.

Which means that, at last, the guessing game can stop.

In a box: Our ranking of high risk ports used the new RMS Marine Cargo Model™, with geospatial analysis of thousands of square kilometers of satellite imagery across ports in 43 countries. RMS’ exposure development team used a proprietary technique for allocating risk exposure across large, complex terminals to assess the ports’ exposure and highlight the risk of port aggregations. The model took into account:

  • Cargo type (e.g. autos, bulk grains, electronics, specie)
  • Precise storage location (e.g. coastal, estuarine, waterside or within dock complex)
  • Storage type (e.g. open air, warehouse, container — stacked or ground level)
  • Dwell time (which can vary due to port automation, labor relations and import/export ratios)

New products and new solutions to discover at this year’s Exceedance

If you are a risk professional that always wants to discover what’s new in our industry, then I’m sure you’d be interested in learning about our new developments: the first RMS high-definition (HD) models, managing novel perils such as cyber, and a total re-examination of more established perils, such as marine cargo.

You can satisfy this craving for the latest thinking, products, and solutions by joining us at Exceedance in Miami this May. With more than sixty sessions plus our general sessions and keynotes, here’s just a selection of the new developments we’ll be covering:

Explore high-definition (HD) modeling

There is a lot of excitement around HD models, representing our next generation of RMS probabilistic modeling, with full-simulation models incorporating the latest technology across all modeling components. You will be among the first to discover our new HD models at Exceedance, with HD modeling powered by RMS(one) for Europe Flood, Japan Typhoon, and New Zealand Earthquake.

It’s not just the models themselves that we will examine; we’ll also look at business-use cases for all RMS HD model components and analytics, from data to maps, and our Model Evaluation Environment, through to portfolio management with RMS(one).

HD modeling at Exceedance

New opportunities from new perils and new models

New perils are always fascinating as they offer growth for those who can harness their potential. To give us all a head start and increase understanding, we have called in leading experts in cyber and terrorism for Exceedance to discuss the latest insights for both these high-profile perils.

While cyber continues to be a serious business threat, (re)insurers’ cautiousness around the systemic nature of the risk sees cyber insurance demand outstripping supply. Matt Olsen, president of IronNet, will give context on the cyber crime environment, with the RMS Cyber Risk team explaining how to assess cyber threat and manage risk accumulations with our new Cyber Accumulation Management System.

Respected terrorism expert Bruce Hoffman will offer his view of a world where extremism is on the rise, as we also show the similarities and differences between modeling a human-made peril compared to traditional natural catastrophe modeling concepts and practices.

Finally, with the sheer scale of global trade seeing accumulations of billions of dollars of cargo at global ports, a new approach to modeling marine cargo insurance is needed. We’ll show examples of sample modeled losses using our new RMS Cargo and Specie Model, explain how to manage a global cargo portfolio, and tackle accumulations in prime risk areas such as ports.

Explore The Lab and Mini Theater at Exceedance

I hope you can join us at Exceedance.

Cracking the Cargo Conundrum

The smoke from nearby forest fires drifting across the entrance to the Port of Singapore wasn’t unduly worrying the captain of Titan, arriving from Shanghai with 10,000 containers on board. He had clocked the oil tanker off his starboard side and was content that, after obviously having a few navigational hiccups, the pilot of that vessel was now holding a course and speed safely out of Titan’s way. It was as he relaxed back in his chair and looked out across the bow that the smoke thinned out and he saw it. Another tanker. Huge. Q­max class carrying liquefied natural gas.

This is not the plot of a blockbuster book or the climactic scene of a Hollywood disaster movie. It is one of a number of plausible scenarios in the new RMS report on the challenges facing insurers because of the huge growth in marine cargo.

The report “Marine Cargo Catastrophe Modeling: Navigating the Challenges, Charting the Opportunities” examines the outdated techniques and incomplete data that marine insurers have had to make do with in order to estimate their cargo cat risk and port accumulations. Put simply, for too long knowing how much exposure they’ve built up in enormous international ports has been a guessing game. And two recent CAT events, which caused multibillion dollar losses because of huge concentrations of cargo, have exposed this weakness to an uncomfortable scrutiny.

The risks of global trade

Whereas the risks for land or property are essentially static, cargos are constantly moving and so the risk variables might seem unfathomably complicated. It’s not just the number of ports the vessel will go through and the CAT­ risks in those locations: hurricanes, storm surges, earthquakes, and terrorist attacks. Consideration needs to be given to the geology in that region, the construction of the ports in that country, and the level of disaster­ preparedness that exists.

As we saw during Superstorm Sandy, loss outcomes can be influenced by factors such as the exact location of cargo storage (In containers? In warehouses? Stacked?). Equally important is the vulnerability of the products. Are they fragile like electronics (ruined by water) or more resilient like jewelry (which can more easily be salvaged)?

The new RMS report in combination with the soon-to-be launched RMS Marine Cargo Model will bring clarity to these issues.

A purpose-built model for the industry

The RMS Marine Cargo and Specie model will be generally available this May, with the launch of RiskLink version 16.

To develop the model, the RMS geospatial team analyzed thousands of square kilometers of satellite imagery of top global ports and created a proprietary technique for allocating risk exposure across port terminals and storage structures. The port Industry Exposure Databases (IEDs) included in the RMS Marine Cargo Model, also incorporate important information on “dwell time,” or how long cargo spends at a given location. This variable, which is critical in determining port accumulations, can be highly influenced by variables such as weather, port automation, import/export ratios, and labor relations.

Covering almost 80 countries and three perils (wind, storm surge, and earthquake), the new marine model will provide 11 high-resolution and 150 medium resolution port industry exposure database, enabling the best insight on cargo vulnerability and global port accumulation currently available to the industry.