Tag Archives: interconnected risk

New Risks in Our Interconnected World

Heraclitus taught us more than 2,500 years ago that the only constant is change. And one of the biggest changes in our lifetime is that everything is interconnected. Today, global business is about networks of connections continents apart.

In the past, insurers were called on to protect discrete things: homes, buildings and belongings. While that’s still very much the case, globalization and the rise of the information economy means we are also being called upon to protect things like trading relationships, digital assets, and intellectual property.

Technological progress has led to a seismic change in how we do business. There are many factors driving this change: the rise of new powers like China and India, individual attitudes and even the climate. However, globalization and technology aren’t just symbiotic bedfellows; they are the factor stimulating the greatest change in our societies and economies.

The number, size, and types of networks are growing and will continue to do so. Understanding globalization and modeling interconnectedness is, in my opinion, the key challenge for the next era of risk modeling. I will discuss examples that merit particular attention in future blogs, including:

  • Marine risks: More than 90% of the world’s trade is carried by sea. Seaborne trade has quadrupled in my lifetime and shows no sign of relenting. To manage cargo, hull, and the related marine sublines well, the industry needs to better understand the architecture and the behavior of the global shipping network.
  • Corporate and Government risks: Corporations and public entities are increasingly exposed to networked risks: physical, virtual or in between. The global supply chain, for example, is vulnerable to shocks and disruptions. There are no local events anymore. What can corporations and government entities do to better understand the risks presented by their relationships with critical third parties? What can the insurance industry and the capital markets do to provide CBI coverage responsibly?
  • Cyber risks: This is an area where interconnectedness is crucial.  More of the world’s GDP is tied up in digital networks than in cargo. As Dr. Gordon Woo often says, the cyber threat is persistent and universal. There are a million cyber attacks every minute. How can insurers awash with capital deploy it more confidently to meet a strong demand for cyber coverage?

Globalization is real, extreme, and relentless. Until the Industrial Revolution, the pace of change was very slow. Sure, empires rose and fell. Yes, natural disasters redefined the terrain.

But until relatively recently, virtually all the world’s population worked in agriculture—and only a tiny fraction of the global population were rulers, religious leaders or merchants. So, while the world may actually be less globalized than we perceive it to be, it is undeniable that it is much flatter than it was.

As the world continues to evolve and the megacities in Asia modernize, the risk transfer market could grow tenfold. As emerging economies shift away from a reliance on a government backstops towards a culture of looking to private market solutions, the amount of risk transferred will increase significantly. The question for the insurance industry is whether it is ready to seize the opportunity.

The number, size, and types of networks are growing and will only continue to do so. Protecting this new interconnected world is our biggest challenge—and the biggest opportunity to lead.

Risk, Models, and Innovations: It’s All Interconnected

A few themes came through loud and clear during this morning’s keynote sessions at Exceedance 2015.

RMS’ commitment to modeling innovation was unmistakable. As RMS co-founder and CEO Hemant Shah highlighted on stage, RMS worked hard and met our commitment to release RiskLink version 15 on March 31, taking extra measures to ensure the quality of the product.

Over the past five years, RMS has released 210 model upgrades and 35 new models. With a 30% increase in model development resources over the last two years and 10 HD models in various stages of research and development, RMS has the most robust model pipeline in its history.

As Paul Wilson explained, HD models are all about providing better clarity into the risk. They are a more precise representation of the way a physical damage results in a (re)insurance loss, with a more precise treatment of propagation of uncertainty through the model, designed to deal with losses as closely as possible as the way claims occur in real life.

HD models are the cornerstone of the work RMS is doing in model development right now. HD models represent the intersection of RMS research, science and technology. With HD models we are not limited by software – we can approach the challenge of modeling risk in exciting new ways.

And it’s more than just the models – RMS is committed to transparency, engagement, and collaboration.

RMS’ commitment to RMS(one) was also clear. Learning from the lessons of the past year, RMS developing an open platform that’s not just about enabling RMS to build its own models. It’s an exposure and risk management platform that’s about enabling clients and partners to build models. It’s about analytics, dynamic risk management and more.

RMS(one) will be released, judiciously and fully-matured, in stages over the next 15 months,starting with a model evaluation environment for our first HD Model, Europe Flood, in autumn 2015.

And, Hemant emphasized that starting later this calendar year, RMS will open the platform to its clients and partners with the Platform Development Kit (PDK).

In addition, RMS(one) pricing will be built around three core principles:

  • Simple, predictable packages
  • In most cases, no additional fees for clients who simply want continuity in their RMS modeling relationships
  • Clearly differentiated high-value packages at compelling prices for those who wish to benefit from RMS(one) beyond its replacement as a superior modeling utility to RiskLink

The overall goal of RMS’ commitment to modeling and technology innovation is to capitalize on a growing and ever-changing global (re)insurance market, ultimately building a more resilient global society. RMS is working with industry clients and partners to do so by understanding emerging risks, identifying new opportunities to insure more risk, developing new risk transfer products, and creating new ways of measuring risk.

As Ben Brookes said, we only have to look at the recent events in Nepal to understand that there are huge opportunities – and needs – to improve resilience and the management of risk. RMS’ work for Metrocat, a catastrophe bond designed specifically to protect the New York MTA’s infrastructure against storm surge, showed the huge potential for the developing alternate methods of risk transfer in order to improve resilience.

And during his session, Daniel Stander pointed out that only 1.9% of the global economy is insured. As the world’s means of production shifts from assets to systems, RMS is working to understand how to understand systems of risk, starting with marine, supply chain, and cyber risk, tackling tough questions such as:

  • What are the choke points in the global shipping network, and how do they respond under stress?
  • How various events create a ripple effect that impact the global supply chain – for example, why did the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan cause a shortage of iPads in Australia, halt production at BMW in Germany, and enable a booming manufacturing industry in Guangzhou?
  • How do we measure cyber risk when technology has become so critical that it is systemically important to the global economy?

global shipping

Leaving the keynotes, a clear theme rang true: as the world becomes more interconnected, it is the intersection of innovation in science and technology that will enable us to scale and solve global problems head on.