Category Archives: RMS(one)

Indonesia’s Protection Gap – How the Sumatra Earthquake Shows that Coverage Must Spread

On December 7, 2016, a shallow magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck northern Sumatra in Indonesia, severely damaging or destroying more than ten thousand homes and many businesses, as well as causing over a hundred deaths. The disaster struck a poorer area away from the major cities, where the standards of building design, construction methods, and material quality are not sufficient to withstand such an earthquake.

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USGS Shake map for Mw 6.5 Earthquake

We have up-to-date research on local building design and construction practices in Indonesia, which we have incorporated into the latest version of the RMS® Indonesia Earthquake Model. This research was done last year when members of the RMS vulnerability team, including me, visited southeast Asia as part of the process to update the model. We held workshops with local earthquake engineering experts who practice there, and attended an earthquake engineering conference, as well as visiting commercial and industrial buildings, including those under construction, to see first-hand how they were designed and built.

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A workshop with local experts

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International Conference – Jogja Earthquake in Reflection (May, 2016)

This on-the-ground research provided insights into Indonesia’s rules and practices around construction, seismic design, code enforcement, as well as information on the relative quantities of different types of buildings in the country. We discovered significant differences between mainstream construction and those buildings covered by earthquake insurance, namely:

  • Past earthquakes have demonstrated that single family dwellings and/or low rise buildings are the most vulnerable building types compared to those built for commercial and industrial use, because of a lack of engineering design, poor construction, and lower material quality.
  • Buildings outside of major cities are mostly low rises and they may not be designed for earthquake risk.
  • Major cities such as Jakarta, Bandung, and Surabaya enforce a strict structural design review process for the construction of mid- and high-rise buildings.
  • Insurance penetration rates are higher for commercial and industrial buildings in and near major cities, with much lower penetration for residential properties in rural areas.

It’s perhaps not surprising that if poorer communities have less insurance protection, that they also cannot afford to invest in the higher quality construction that is designed to better withstand earthquakes. This is one of the primary reasons for the ‘protection gap’. As these countries become more developed, there’s the potential for that gap to start closing. In fact, Indonesia is one of the fastest growing economies in southeast Asia, with the property insurance and (re)insurance market expanding rapidly.

But as the earthquake disaster demonstrated, there are still many poorer regions with low insurance penetration which are also prone to repeated natural disasters. Sadly, there is still a long way to go before people in those places benefit from the resilience in their built environment which other, richer parts of the world may take for granted.

Exceedance 2017 Is Coming to New Orleans!

Welcome to the first in a series of blogs leading up to Exceedance 2017, March 20-23.

We’re looking forward to the event, which will be held at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans. Situated less than a mile from the historic French Quarter, and about a mile-and-a-half from Jackson Square, it’s a great location in the heart of the ‘Big Easy.’

This year’s theme, ‘Create Resilience,’ reflects the strength and spirit of New Orleans, including the tremendous progress made in the ten years since the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. Exceedance 2017 will emphasize how innovation, analytics, and ingenuity can create more resilience in our global catastrophe risk management practices.

Hands-On Training for Risk Modeler on the RMS(one) Platform and Version 17

With the release of Risk Modeler on the RMS(one)® platform and Version 17 upcoming in April, this year’s Exceedance schedule is focused on training and enablement. It’s the only place to get key insights into these new RMS releases – and be trained to assess risk more effectively.

Exceedance2017Exceedance will feature over 22 speakers and provide many opportunities to dive deep into more than 20 new models, including North America Earthquake, North Atlantic Hurricane, and major advances in science, software, and HD-simulation models.

The agenda is designed to provide attendees with all the information they need for our new solutions developed for a rapidly changing market. Solutions that will increase operational effectiveness, agility, resilience, and business growth.

Take Some Time to Have Some Fun

Along with experiencing all there is to see and learn at Exceedance, there are plenty of opportunities to relax and have some fun with the following pre-conference activities:

Golf at TPC Louisiana: Enjoy a round at TPC Louisiana, rated one of Golfweek’s “Best Courses You Can Play.” It’s a great place for you and your colleagues to experience a one-of-a-kind day on a championship golf course.

Tour the Lower 9th Ward: Join the Make It Right Foundation for a walking tour of the Lower 9th Ward. You’ll experience first-hand how innovative partnerships and community-led design sessions are transforming the neighborhood that was most devastated by Hurricane Katrina.

Horse-Drawn Carriage Ride and Cooking Class: Journey through the French Quarter by carriage, where you’ll pass through the city’s eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French and Spanish architecture. Then, satisfy your appetite with chef extraordinaire Amy Sins who will guide you through an interactive culinary experience that ends with a delectable meal.

Spirits and Spirits – an Evening Tour: Take a guided evening stroll through the spooky side of the old French Quarter. You’ll hear tales from the city’s storied history, and perhaps even encounter a ghost or two. Then enjoy local cocktail favorites at one of New Orleans’s oldest restaurants, a former Spanish armory.

To learn more about these events, visit the Exceedance website. If you’re ready to register, fill out your form.

Exceedance will be here soon, so look for our next blog in two weeks. It will include the latest information on the session tracks and content, as well as details of the keynote speakers.

Customers Adopt Solutions on the RMS(one) Platform

Exposure Manager, the first solution on the RMS(one)® platform, launched in July and has created great momentum in the market.

Insurance and reinsurance firms using Exposure Manager gain a clearer view of risk accumulations. With insight into their diverse set of exposures in both modeled and non-modeled regions, they are able to better manage exposure concentrations, and can help avoid private catastrophes.

Today, we announced that Mitsui Sumitomo Marine Management has chosen Exposure Manager to strengthen its risk accumulation management, taking a “big data” approach for dynamic exposure management. They are among the first in a wave of companies to adopt Exposure Manager to minimize blind spots in their risk portfolios.

Since July, we’ve been previewing some of the other solutions due out on the RMS(one) platform – from one-on-one meetings with clients leading all the way up to the main stage at Exceedance 2017 (registration is now open!). Our customers are in various stages of evaluating and adopting RMS(one) solutions and are excited to capitalize on the advantages that these solutions will bring.

As one of the many ways we are helping customers along their adoption journeys, we recently held our first Hack Event, Powered by RMS(one). Our customers in the London market attended a full-day session to understand their options, choose the right solution for their business goals, and map out adoption strategies. Due to the event’s success, we will be holding additional Hack Events in the coming months as we march toward releases for a full suite of solutions on the RMS(one) platform.

We will share more as customers continue to implement solutions on the RMS(one) platform and realize business benefits as we all work toward a common goal of building a more resilient global society.

Learn how to build portfolio intuition faster and access metrics that matter with Exposure Manager.

See How Quickly and Easily You Can Access the Exposure Metrics That Matter

Exposure Manager is a risk management solution that provides executives, underwriters, risk analysts, and other decision-makers with the exposure analytics needed to offer a comprehensive view of risk and understand loss potential.

As the first solution released on the RMS(one) platform, Exposure Manager was developed based on the understanding that organizations not only need quick and reliable assessments of exposure concentrations, but also the right tools to ensure they can access key metrics and insights.

The videos below illustrate two of the important capabilities that enhance users’ ability to build portfolio intuition faster and quickly access the metrics that are most important.

Build Portfolio Intuition Faster provides insights into how Exposure Manager enables customers to quickly and efficiently derive deeper portfolio insights using an intuitive and user-friendly interface.

With a customizable interface that conveys the information that’s most important to the user, Exposure Manager’s analytics, enabled by an intuitive best-in-class user experience, can be configured without knowledge of SQL or support from IT.

This enhances the ability for customers to create quick insights into their portfolio or perform a deep dive into their book to make quick assessments.

Access Metrics That Matter shows how Exposure Manager leverages the RMS financial model to provide an exposed limit metric. This offers a consistent view of loss potential to enable precise identification of loss drivers.

The flexible interface provides users with precise control to quickly make informed decisions about their book and help identify threats and opportunities in the portfolio.

All of these benefits allow customers to become more incisive about their portfolio.

Tracking Matthew – The Devil in the Detail

Hurricane Matthew aptly demonstrated that slight shifts in a tropical cyclone’s timing, track, and wind field extent can make a huge difference in its overall impact to exposures at risk.

As Matthew bore down on the U.S. after devastating Haiti, it had the makings of another industry-altering event. Had the storm made landfall along the Florida coast, likely as a category 4 storm, insured losses could have been ten times larger than the $1.5 billion to $5 billion range that is currently projected by RMS.

Given that Matthew’s strongest winds were confined to a small area within its inner core, its path proved to be critical. A difference in track of just a few dozen miles translated to a material reduction in wind impacts along the coastline and into interior portions of Florida. The fact that the storm stayed just offshore helped to minimize overall damages significantly throughout the state and the (re)insurance industry at large.

Storms like Matthew signify the importance of being able to track dynamic tropical cyclone characteristics, position, and damage potential accurately as the storm unfolds in order to help communities and businesses adequately prepare and respond.

There is a wealth of public and private data to inform real-time tropical cyclone wind field assessments and event response processes, but some data provides more insight than others. Commonly used public sources include worldwide and national tropical cyclone centers, numerical weather prediction models, and numerous forecast offices or research organizations.

In the U.S., one of the better-known public sources for tropical cyclone data is the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami, Florida. A branch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the NHC provides a range of tropical cyclone data, tools, analyses, and forecasts to inform real-time tropical cyclone assessments in the Atlantic and East Pacific basins.

There are also private sources of tropical cyclone wind field data that span a wide breadth and depth of useful information, few of which provide insight that goes beyond what is provided by the NHC.

One exception to that is HWind, formally known as HWind Scientific. Acquired by RMS in 2015, the provider of tropical cyclone wind field data develops observation-based data products for both real-time and historical wind field analyses in the Atlantic, East Pacific, and Central Pacific Basins.

During a real-time event, HWind provides regularly-derived snapshots of wind field conditions leading up to and following landfall, as well as post-event wind hazard footprints 1-3 days after the storm impacts land. Each analysis is informed by access to an observational data network spanning more than 30 land, air, and sea-based platforms, all of which are subject to stringent independence and quality control testing.

On average, tens of thousands of observations are used for each event, depending on the availability and the storm’s proximity to land.

Figure 1: GIF animation of all RMS HWind snapshots for Hurricane Matthew (September 28 through October 9, 2016). Wind is represented as maximum 1-minute sustained winds over open water for marine exposure, and over open terrain over land.

HWind products tend to represent wind hazard characteristics with more frequency, accuracy, and granularity than many publically available sources, including the NHC.

From a frequency perspective, HWind snapshots are created and refreshed as often as every three hours throughout the event as soon as aircraft reconnaissance begins, allowing users to track changing storm conditions as the event evolves.

The data also discerns important factors such as storm location with a high degree of granularity and precision, often correcting for center-position errors and biases that are evident in some observational data sources, or adjusting wind speeds to account for the impact of terrain.

Each snapshot also includes a high-resolution representation of local wind speeds and hazard bands.


Figure 2: Preliminary wind hazard footprint for Hurricane Matthew (2016) based on the NHC (left) and RMS HWind (right), where winds are represented as maximum 1-minutes sustained in kts (left) and mph (right).

During events like Hurricane Matthew and the events that are yet to come, private sources like HWind can provide additional and timely insight needed to understand the aspects of wind hazard that matter most to a (re)insurer’s business and event response processes.

Using this information, risk managers can more accurately quantify exposure accumulations at risk during or immediately following landfall. Crucially, this allows them to anticipate the potential severity of loss claims with more precision, and position claims adjusters or recovery assets more effectively.

Collectively, it could mean the difference between being proactive vs. reactive when the next event strikes.

What could be your exposed limit loss to Major Hurricane Matthew?

Hurricane Matthew is currently moving along the Florida coast with high winds, heavy rain, and a large surge. But as early as three days ago RMS clients were estimating their exposed limit in the path of the storm. How was that analysis generated?

On Thursday October 6 an RMS Exposure Manager analysis of the RMS 2011 Industry Exposure Database (IED) was performed. It found approximately $2.77 trillion of total insured value (TIV) exists within ZIP codes that had a five percent likelihood of experiencing hurricane-force winds – as forecast by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) while the storm was still a long way from the U.S. coast.

Clients were able to feed in insights from the RMS Event Response team to understand the breadth of potential industry losses. Even based on these early forecasts, it was clear this could be a significant event, as you can see from these videos.

Description:  An accumulation analysis is performed against the RMS Wind IED based upon a view of postal codes, as of October 6, that have 5% probability or greater of experiencing hurricane force wind.

But whilst understanding how much the industry is exposed is important to a portfolio manager, understanding how much their own organization could lose is critical. This next video shows how clients used RMS Event Response output on October 6, two days before projected landfall, to quickly produce a range of exposed limit estimates by applying varying damage factors.  With this insight, clients could understand how much exposure they have within the path of the storm using the RMS Financial Model in Exposure Manager.

Description:  An accumulation analysis is performed against an E&S portfolio to calculate exposed limits using various damage ratios based upon a view of postal codes, as of October 6, that have 5% probability or greater of experiencing hurricane force wind.

Description:  An accumulation analysis is performed against an E&S portfolio to calculate exposed limits using a shape file from the National Hurricane Center, which shows areas potentially affected by hurricane force surface winds (1-minute average <= 74mph) banded by probability.

Exceedance 2016: Welcome Back to Miami!

We are back in sunny Miami, FL for Exceedance 2016 and ready for a week of engaging sessions, invigorating discussion, and plenty of networking opportunities.

If you’re joining us again here at the Fontainebleau Hotel, meet us in the Fleur De Lis Ballroom tonight at 5:30 p.m. for the Welcome Reception. If you were unable to make it this year, follow the highlights as we share on Twitter and LinkedIn, and here on the RMS Blog for #Exceedance news, insights, and photos.

Over the course of three days we have more than 60 sessions across six different tracks, so there is no shortage of thought-provoking content and discussions to be had. Download the mobile app to help you manage your schedule and maximize your week.

Here are a few highlights as you plan out your week:

This year, our lineup of keynote speakers includes:

  • Professor Bruce Hoffman, terrorism and security expert
  • Tim Jarvis, environmental scientist, author, adventurer
  • Matt Olsen, a president and co-founder, IronNet Cybersecurity
  • Hemant Shah, RMS Co-founder and CEO
  • Robert Muir-Wood, RMS Chief Research Officer
  • Emily Paterson, RMS Event Response Lead
  • Mark Powell, VP and Founder, HWind
  • Emily Grover-Kopec, VP, Model Product Strategy
  • Arno Hilberts, Senior Director, Global Flood Models
  • Shree Khare, Senior Director, Asia Models
  • Chris Folkman, Director, Marine and Terrorism Models
  • Tom Harvey, Product Manager, Cyber Models

The Lab: During breakfast and lunch, be sure to stop by The Lab to meet RMS experts and learn latest about RiskAssessor, RiskLink® version 16, Hosting Plus, and much more. Looking for some hands-on exercise? Join us to assemble 50 partially built bikes for donation to several Miami-based charities.

“EP” – The Exceedance Party: This year’s EP will be a vision in white, inspired by retro Miami and Fontainebleau’s heyday. Join us in Glimmer Ballroom to show off your dance moves to a five-piece band and DJ while enjoying specialty cocktails, lively conversations, delicious bites, a candy bar, photo booth, and more!

We’re excited to see you in Miami and are looking forward to a great week ahead!

Risk, Models, and Innovations: It’s All Interconnected

A few themes came through loud and clear during this morning’s keynote sessions at Exceedance 2015.

RMS’ commitment to modeling innovation was unmistakable. As RMS co-founder and CEO Hemant Shah highlighted on stage, RMS worked hard and met our commitment to release RiskLink version 15 on March 31, taking extra measures to ensure the quality of the product.

Over the past five years, RMS has released 210 model upgrades and 35 new models. With a 30% increase in model development resources over the last two years and 10 HD models in various stages of research and development, RMS has the most robust model pipeline in its history.

As Paul Wilson explained, HD models are all about providing better clarity into the risk. They are a more precise representation of the way a physical damage results in a (re)insurance loss, with a more precise treatment of propagation of uncertainty through the model, designed to deal with losses as closely as possible as the way claims occur in real life.

HD models are the cornerstone of the work RMS is doing in model development right now. HD models represent the intersection of RMS research, science and technology. With HD models we are not limited by software – we can approach the challenge of modeling risk in exciting new ways.

And it’s more than just the models – RMS is committed to transparency, engagement, and collaboration.

RMS’ commitment to RMS(one) was also clear. Learning from the lessons of the past year, RMS developing an open platform that’s not just about enabling RMS to build its own models. It’s an exposure and risk management platform that’s about enabling clients and partners to build models. It’s about analytics, dynamic risk management and more.

RMS(one) will be released, judiciously and fully-matured, in stages over the next 15 months,starting with a model evaluation environment for our first HD Model, Europe Flood, in autumn 2015.

And, Hemant emphasized that starting later this calendar year, RMS will open the platform to its clients and partners with the Platform Development Kit (PDK).

In addition, RMS(one) pricing will be built around three core principles:

  • Simple, predictable packages
  • In most cases, no additional fees for clients who simply want continuity in their RMS modeling relationships
  • Clearly differentiated high-value packages at compelling prices for those who wish to benefit from RMS(one) beyond its replacement as a superior modeling utility to RiskLink

The overall goal of RMS’ commitment to modeling and technology innovation is to capitalize on a growing and ever-changing global (re)insurance market, ultimately building a more resilient global society. RMS is working with industry clients and partners to do so by understanding emerging risks, identifying new opportunities to insure more risk, developing new risk transfer products, and creating new ways of measuring risk.

As Ben Brookes said, we only have to look at the recent events in Nepal to understand that there are huge opportunities – and needs – to improve resilience and the management of risk. RMS’ work for Metrocat, a catastrophe bond designed specifically to protect the New York MTA’s infrastructure against storm surge, showed the huge potential for the developing alternate methods of risk transfer in order to improve resilience.

And during his session, Daniel Stander pointed out that only 1.9% of the global economy is insured. As the world’s means of production shifts from assets to systems, RMS is working to understand how to understand systems of risk, starting with marine, supply chain, and cyber risk, tackling tough questions such as:

  • What are the choke points in the global shipping network, and how do they respond under stress?
  • How various events create a ripple effect that impact the global supply chain – for example, why did the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan cause a shortage of iPads in Australia, halt production at BMW in Germany, and enable a booming manufacturing industry in Guangzhou?
  • How do we measure cyber risk when technology has become so critical that it is systemically important to the global economy?

global shipping

Leaving the keynotes, a clear theme rang true: as the world becomes more interconnected, it is the intersection of innovation in science and technology that will enable us to scale and solve global problems head on.

The Journey to Sendai and Beyond

Sendai is a city of a million people 2 hours north of Tokyo on the Shinkansen bullet train. From March 14-17, 2015 it will attract seven thousand people to the 3rd UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR). Twelve heads of state (including one king and one emperor), seven prime ministers and 135 ministers and vice ministers, will be present to launch a fifteen year program of coordinated action around disaster risk reduction.

The conference is being hosted in Sendai because of the city’s recent experience of a mega-catastrophe. Just four years after the great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 and the coastal villages adjacent to Sendai still bear the scour marks where the great tsunami surged inland through the pine forests, removing many buildings off their foundations.

The original International Decade for Disaster Risk Reduction ran from 1990-1999. The second decade from 2005-2015, renewed at Kobe ten years after its devastating 1995 earthquake, was called the Hyogo Framework for Action. The continuation of this international program is currently designed to last for fifteen years. The fact that the frameworks have been renewed reflects reality—while there have been successes for particular regions and perils, the broader goals of worldwide disaster risk reduction have not been met. For example, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake was not anticipated, and as a result had grievous consequences in terms of loss of life and damage to the Fukushima nuclear power plants.

RMS will have four people at the Sendai WCDRR conference. We have obtained a coveted presentation on the main IGNITE stage—the equivalent to a “TED talk.” I will also be speaking on two panel sessions, one organized by The Geneva Association and Tokio Marine, “Insurance as contributors to problem solving and impact reduction,”and a second on the launch of the global set of catastrophe models developed by the UNISDR agency, for which RMS has provided high-level input. We have offered to host these worldwide UNISDR catastrophe models on RMS(one), which will open up access to the models for public officials in developing countries.

We have also worked on a couple of papers (for example, ‘Setting, Measuring and Monitoring: Targets for Disaster Risk Reduction: Recommendations for post-2015 international policy frameworks’) articulating how to measure progress in disaster risk reduction. At present, international frameworks have shied away from setting numerical commitments. We have argued that only probabilistic methods, which simulate thousands of possible events, can show baseline levels of risk, what actions will achieve progress, and whether targets have been achieved. We take Michael Bloomberg’s quote from the foreword to the Risky Business report: “if you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it.”

The work by the UNISDR on catastrophe modeling highlights the accelerated recognition of the role of modeling in managing and reducing disaster risk. There is now a real focus on public-private partnerships in achieving disaster reduction. With RMS’ rich and deep experience in catastrophe modeling, there is much we can offer to these expanded applications. For users of models in governments, public organisations and NGOs, models are required to:

  • explore how to manage a wide range of potential disasters
  • perform cost benefit analyses of alternative actions to reduce risk of loss of life or economic impacts
  • explore potential implications of climate change
  • explore holistically the potential for significant financial shocks to national economies

If you are attending the conference, come and visit us at our booth on the 6th floor of the Sendai International Center where we will be distributing information about our proposals for disaster risk modeling, and articulating our role as leaders in catastrophe risk modeling. It will be a highly publicized event with 500 journalists and around 300 private sector members, including several of our key clients. We will also be meeting with other organizations with which we are affiliated, including the UN Principles for Sustainable Insurance and the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities initiative.

We look forward to sharing more insight after the event.

RMS(one): Tackling a Unique Big Data Problem

I am thrilled to join the team at RMS as CTO, with some sensational prospects for growth ahead of us. I originally came to RMS in a consulting role with CodeFutures Corporation, tapped to consult RMS on the development of RMS(one). In that role, I became fascinated by RMS as a company, by the vision for RMS(one), and by the unique challenges and opportunities that it presented. I am delighted to bring my experience and expertise in-house, where my primary focus is continuing the development of the RMS(one) platform and ensuring a seamless transition from our existing core product line.

I have tackled many big data problems in my previous role as CEO and COO of CodeFutures, where we created a big data platform designed to remove the complexity and limitations of current data management approaches. In my more than 20 years of experience with advanced software architectures, I worked with many of the most innovative and brilliant people in high-performance computing; I have helped organizations address the challenges of big data performance and scalability, encouraging effective applications of emerging technologies to fields including social networking, mobile applications, gaming, and complex computing systems.

Each big data problem is unique, but RMS’ is particularly intriguing. Part of what attracted me to the CTO role at RMS was the idea of tackling head-on the intense technical challenges of delivering a scalable risk management platform to an international group of the world’s leading insurance companies. Risk management is unique in the type and scale of data it manages; traditional big data techniques fall far short when tackling this problem. Not only do we need to handle data and processing at tremendous scale, we need to do it with the speed that meets customer expectations. RMS has customers all around the world and we need to deliver a platform they can all leverage to get results they need and expect.

The primary purpose of RMS(one) is to enable companies in the insurance, reinsurance, and insurance-linked securities industries to run RMS next generation HD catastrophe models. It will also allow them to implement their own models and give them access to others by third-party developers in an ever-growing ecosystem. It is designed as an open exposure and risk management platform on which users can define the full gamut of their exposures and contracts, and then implement their own analytics on a highly scalable and purpose-built cloud-based platform. RMS(one) will offer unprecedented flexibility, as well as truly real-time and dynamic risk management processes that will generate more resilient and profitable portfolios—very exciting stuff!

During development of RMS(one), we have garnered outstanding support and feedback from key customers and joint development partners; we know the platform is the first of its kind—a truly integrated and scalable platform for managing risk has never been accomplished before. Through beta testing we obtained hands-on feedback from said customers that we are leveraging into our new designs and capabilities. The idea is to provide new means to enable risk managers to change how they work, providing better results while expending less effort and time.

I work closely with several teams within the company, including software development, model development, product management, sales, and others to deliver on the platform’s objectives. The most engaging part of this work is turning the plans into workable designs that can then be executed by our teams. There is a tremendous group of talented individuals at RMS, and a big part of my job is to coalesce their efforts into a great final product, leveraging the brilliant ideas I encounter from many parts of the company. It is totally exciting, and our focus is riveted on delivering against the plan for RMS(one).